• The Radiology Group Inc

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BONE DENSITY MEASUREMENT/DXA

BONE DENSITY MEASUREMENT

Diagnosis and follow up of osteoporosis

A bone mineral density (BMD) test can provide a snapshot of your bone health. The test can identify osteoporosis, determine your risk for fractures (broken bones), and measure your response to osteoporosis treatment.  The World Health Organization classify the BMD in terms of a T score.  

 

A T-score shows how much your bone density is higher or lower than the bone density of a healthy 30-year old adult.

Normal is a T score of -1.0 and higher

Osteopenia is a T score of -2,5 to -1.0

Osteoporosis is a T score of below -2,5

Severe osteoporosis is a T score of -2.5 and below with a fragility fracture (like a hip fracture or spinal fracture related to the osteoporosis)

 

The most widely recognized BMD test is called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, or DXA/DEXA. It is painless—a bit like having an x-ray. The test can measure bone density at your hip, forearm and spine.

Quantitative CT scan (QCT) measurement of bone density is another method used to evaluate bone mineral density.

Your risk of osteoporosis increases as you age (especially in postmenopausal women), for heavy smokers, heavy alcohol use and with glucocorticoid use e.g rheumatoid arthritis.

Planning to eat right for healthier bones? Calcium is probably the nutrient you think of first. But vitamin D is just as important for keeping bones strong and preventing bone disease. Consider having your Vitamin D level tested with a blood test.

FAQS

WHEN DO I NEED TO HAVE MY BONE DENSITY TESTED?

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women over the age of 65 should get a DXA scan. The date at which men should be tested is uncertain but some sources recommend age 70. 

 

At risk women should consider getting a scan when their risk is equal to that of a normal 65-year-old woman.

A person's risk can be measured using the World Health Organization's FRAX calculator, which includes many different clinical risk factors including prior fragility fracture, use of glucocorticoids, heavy smoking, excess alcohol intake, rheumatoid arthritis, history of parental hip fracture, chronic renal and liver disease, chronic respiratory disease, long-term use of phenobarbital or phenytoin, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and other risks.

CAN I GET A SAME-DAY APPOINTMENT?

Yes, we will help you the same day.

DO I NEED TO REPEAT THE TEST IF IT IS NORMAL?

Yes, we recommend repeat tests every 2 years.

WHAT DO I NEED TO DO IF THE BONE DENSITY IS INDICATIVE OF OSTEOPOROSIS?

You need to see your GP or endocrinologist if you have a T score below -1.0.

 

Treatment may include lifestyle changes (like smoking cessation, decrease in alcohol intake and increased physical activity) as well as pharmacological management, depending on your T score and risk factors.